Archive for the ‘negotiation’ Category

Lending Code secrecy ‘is a disgrace’

October 12, 2009

I have just released this press release; as you see it is a matter of some seriousness

The new Lending Code, which replaces the credit and financial difficulties sections of the defunct Banking Code, is due to come into effect on November 1. Some nineteen short days away.

There is to be no public sight of these changes, nor any consultation process before these changes come into effect.

Specialist author Joseph Harris – Debt Control Man – has been trying to get sight of these changes since June. He has been told they will not be released until they are in effect on November 1 by Paul Ross, the man who is writing the new document for the British Bankers Association, in an email.

“This is a clear case of dictatorial behaviour,” declares Mr Harris. “It is a disgrace that no one concerned with the field, nor any debtor – whether defaulting or not – has any idea how the changes will affect them.

“Vince Cable was wrong when he said Gordon Brown had changed from Stalin to Mr Bean. On the basis of this secrecy and undemocratic behaviour he remains Stalin.”

Phone calls and emails to the FSA and the OFT result in classic Civil Service dropping the query into the new virtual filing bin.

“Even though there are many rules to help debtors negotiate the treacherous waters of finding the best way for their needs, too many creditors and debt collectors – including the biggest companies – do their best to sidestep them.

“Lack of a clear knowledge of what is happening among debtors and their advisors leaves these worst companies a window of opportunity to harass and bully particularly the poorest and most vulnerable debtors,” adds Mr Harris, author of Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk/book-cydc/cydc_Book_intro.shtml .,

“It is also a tragedy that the opportunity to include the requests of the Treasury Select Committee in 2005 and of the Money Advice Liaison Group has been lost.”

While most of the Banking Code is being operated as statutory Code of Practice directly by the FSA, the credit and financial difficulties sections move to the The Office of Fair Trading to sit beside the OFT’s duties controlling issue of Consumer and Business Credit Licences.

Joseph Harris, Debt Control Man

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Bailiff Power: “We have the balance wrong”

June 13, 2009

Every time I think I have reached the bottom of this government’s inanities over bailiffs I am apprised of further actions which make sense only if these people are in the pay of the financial casino.

Thanks again to the Zacchaeus 2000 Trust I have learned of the Bill introduced by Karen Buck M.P., (Labour for Regent’s Park and Kensington, North), a few days ago under the ten minute rule. It has gone now to second reading which is a triumph for her preparation work which has taken a year.

[Most often ten minute rule Bills are killed at birth!]

In her introductory remarks Ms Buck offers these points which are worth some thought by us all: Bailiffs (Repeals and Amendment) is the title of the Bill and it “… make requirements in respect of the use of force and forcible entry by bailiffs; to make provision for the reference to court of certain cases involving vulnerable clients; and for connected purposes.”

“… Debt and debt recovery action have become a reality for ever larger numbers… the arrival of a bailiff is, for many of those people, the ultimate trauma and humiliation… people have had heart attacks when the bailiffs have arrived. The mental and physical stress… is one of the worst things that will ever happen to them in their life.”

She points out that not all bailiffs fail to be as helpful as possible. But “… many.. are desperate and vulnerable people, and many are also victims of error. … even the actions of bailiffs who behave entirely reasonably… are disproportionate and excessive.”

“… it has become clear to me that we have got the balance wrong,… we need to review… We must certainly not, in any circumstances, think of escalating the powers available to bailiffs, and the Government should rethink their approach to regulation.” [my emphasis]

“… In my local authority alone, and in respect of just… council tax… more than 13,000 cases ended up in the hands of bailiffs over a three-year period.”

“What does it mean… It means fear and trauma for people, particularly children. I have heard of moving cases… children have refused to leave the house or have insisted on having the lights out at home because they are so frightened of a bailiff… seizing their television or computer.”

“… also means an escalation of the original debt, which simply compounds the problems that caused the financial crisis in the first place.”

“For one single parent with three children, one… disabled… (a) parking fine, about which I was making representations, had escalated from an original £60 to £700 by the time the bailiffs arrived.” [my emphasis]

In another “… two sets of bailiffs (were) chasing the same debt. Payments had been made to and acknowledged by the council, but did not then appear on the system.” [my emphasis] This lady wrote “… each party refers me to the other, the fees are ever increasing and.. threatening the removal of goods for the same amount.”

The Bill’s aims “.. are threefold. The power of forcible entry into a person’s home and the power for bailiffs even to use force against debtors are far too extreme to be given to civilian enforcement officers. The balance has been tilted too far against the householder’s right to be secure from trespass into their home. ” [my emphasis]

“… overturns a long-standing common law tradition,… in the Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007… some p[owers] have not (yet) been brought into effect… such powers should be repealed.”

“… the power to enter domestic premises forcibly… for collection of criminal fines is already legal, and that too is creating appalling distress for many vulnerable households. Many… fines are levied on people on low incomes for offences such as the non-payment of TV licences, fare dodging and truancy.”

“… the issue here, too, is one of proportionality,… I also seek a statutory procedure requiring bailiffs to return cases involving vulnerable and impoverished debtors to the courts or the creditors, and powers to allow people subject to any bailiff action to apply to the courts for any bailiff warrant to be suspended… (this) is (currently) available only to people subject to county court bailiff warrants.”

“… case law, which holds that a distress warrant cannot be withdrawn once it has been issued. That directly contradicts the national standards for enforcement agents, which suggests a procedure enabling the bailiff to return cases of vulnerable fine defaulters to the court.”

“… disproportionate fines are being paid by benefit claimants and other low-income groups, intensifying the poverty that pushed many of them into debtY Finally, we need a statutory provision for bailiffs to accept ‘affordable payments’, with a definition of what that might mean in practice…”

“… I believe that they need greater protection, and above all, to be freed from the fear of the implementation of the excessively harsh powers held in reserve in the legislation.”

The Bill has six more stages; second and third reading in the Commons; first, second and third readings in the Lords; and signature by Her Majesty. It is only a pity that with this government tottering and the next election in any case but a year away the chances of it becoming law are slim.

But ‘good on yer’ Karen Black; you’re one we need back in the Commons. And keep it up Zacchaeus Trust; we need you.

Debt Control Man

Does the FOS Work for Us?

April 14, 2009

I have earlier praised the Financial Ombudsman Service for its very existence.

My thinking is that it will act as a check on creditor failures to observe the rules, and that findings would take into account these rules in dealing as ‘piggy in the middle’.

Well I’ve been in ‘the waiting room’ of the FOS now for over a year and I am far less certain of this. Even more important I am very concerned at the extent to which the debtor has still to fight to get a proper hearing.

I cannot give you full details of the cases involved, since to mention the companies could well bring those savage legal departments sniffing like the monsters in any one of a thousand science fiction films! I can say that the process of the FOS is wearing for the debtor.

That process is three-stage. More if you take the delays into account.

The queue does of course relate to the changes in the volume of work, and the time it takes to train up; no basic criticism over that since it has to take the banks’ unfairness on its shoulders. and we know there is plenty of that.

First stage of actual process is with the adjudicator. Here one is dealing with a new process, so in essence it is necessary to repeat the arguments you have given to make sure they are fully understood, together with one’s perceived faults in the bank or credit card company response.

If you don’t like that – and from my experience don’t expect to – you can ask for the adjudication to be reviewed. If you don’t like that you can request your case go to an actual Ombudsman. Each time you need to re-present your case to some extent.

Now I am sure many people are happy with their experiences at the FOS so I am not going to dismiss its work out of hand, but sometime this year I will be dealing with an actual Ombudsman and that will certainly tell me whether I still have praise for the process.

Any way, for the umpteenth time now I am having to prepare my response to what I consider an appalling adjudication which reads to me almost like a letter from one of the companies.

I plan to write more on the service, and on the whole process, here, in my book, and on my website.

Joseph Harris
Debt Control Man

Negotiating With Creditors for Changes in Terms and Loan and Debt Schedules – 1

September 16, 2008

When you have sent you creditors your second letter, or if the matter of your having trouble keeping up payments has come up another way with them, you are deep in negotiation territory.

Even if you choose to use an intermediary—with a debt management plan, or an IVA, or consolidation—you must take charge of how it is to be done and what it will cost and how long you will be tied to repayments; and all the other changes of terms these moves entail.

It is because you become at the mercy of a routine system through this that I strongly advise doing it all yourself. The best of the intermediaries still have you as only one of a large number of clients. And they can tie you to something that can in turn become difficult to maintain. So at least make sure you understand exactly what is on offer. Always ask questions—and insist on an answer you understand.

If you watched the stream of of highly paid workers being summarily dismissed by the collapsing banks you should note how easy it is to go from easy control of your finances to loss of control. Was it Lehman Brothers in New York whose workers average a monthly pay cheque of $330,000; that’s about £160,000 or £1.9m a year.

You can imagine what rents or mortgages they pay, cars they drive, clubs they belong to. How they eat and pass their day is easy to adjust, if uncomfortable, but these call for many judgements abut their future objectives; staying in the loop or making a life change!

Suddenly they are going to have no income, and their insurances may well be on the line too. These were regarded as safe, well-paying jobs with prospects. When disaster strikes it usually comes unheralded or with little notice.

It is things like this I urge you to think about when deciding how to negotiate. What objectives to set yourself, how to think through your living costs, what the size of the debt is and the realistic chances of repaying it

Always remember you are the only one who really knows your position and needs. Your wants may have to be revised. But you should think of living a reasonable life even in this situation.

And seeking all the advice and information you can.

Joseph Harris
Debt Control Man