Posts Tagged ‘bankers’

Two Worlds, Bankers and Services

December 9, 2009

The impression of a yawning gulf between two worlds was hammered home today.

On the one side we have reckless gamblers, known as bankers, again raking in cash and handsomely rewarding themselves, on the other there is a threat of extremely severe cuts in local services.

Add that to the high levels of unemployment and the collapsing infrastructure of the nation and I can only repeat again that we are in serious danger of becoming the new serfs to the new feudal lords.

This morning’s Financial Times carries a long report (Do-it-yourself warning as state cuts back) of forecasts by the most senior Local Authority professionals. So serious is the matter that we have a joint report from the Society of Local Authority Chief Executives, and the Chartered Institute for Public Finance and Accounting.

 They expect a cut in local services by one third over the three years 2011, 12 and 13. With Alistair Darling forecasting government cuts of over an eighth one might wonder how George Osborne is going to ensure ‘we are all in this together’! If he becomes Chancellor…

 The idea of bankers paying their fair share – any share – of the ‘fine mess they’ve gotten us into’ recedes more every day. They complain that they would not be able to hold onto the best staff otherwise. To which the question must be ‘Best for what?’.

 “But there is undoubtedly going to be a need for individuals and families and communities to do more for themselves, along with the voluntary sector, rather than looking to the state as the provider of first resort,” comment our doughty professionals.

 Bankers, of course, faced no such restrictions to save their bonuses. And, to make that possible,  we are seeing the price we will have to pay for a very long time. Who says ‘the prices is worth it?’ Not those doing the paying.

 For me this raises a very important question. Who is all this for?

 We are dazzled with figures about how we must trade, we must find the cheapest labour, we must become efficient. But must we?

 It certainly makes company balance sheets look better. But who is that for? Not for you and me. Does it matter how cheaply goods are imported if we are out of work and unable to buy them? If just having our refuse collected costs an arm and a leg – or if it is not going to be collected at all?

 It raises many questions about how we organise our world; and many questions about what is important to us as people. Over the coming years those questions will be major discussion points.

 We are offered figures which show green shoots of hope. Today’s double whammy from national and local government leave me feeling distinctly in depression.

Joseph Harris – Debt Control Man
 http://controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk
 Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms

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Fit For The Twenty-First Century

May 23, 2009

 Can there any longer be any doubt that our political system in the UK is broke? Or that the world financial system is broke? Or our economy, or the way we allow companies to be our bosses? They say ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’. But what we need to know now is what to do when it IS broke!

 One thing that is not broke, even if it is limping rather seriously, is our democracy here in the UK and those throughout the world. And in theory we run it all through democratic process. I mean, well, we DO – don’t we?

😉

OK, take out those that are seriously adrift, like Zimbabwe in the hands of the most evil of people: Mugabe. And be a little kindly to the emerging ones like China.

We are left, frankly, with an awful lot of dross! Here in the UK we have our daily feast of a Parliament in crisis, courtesy of the Daily Telegraph (fully justifying the freedom of the press); and the media’s status as the fourth estate.

In America as well as here the sights of incompetent bankers being rewarded for their reckless and criminal gambling and of businesses that should have folded decades ago being massaged back to life in intensive care leaves one wondering where our leaders minds are.

We cry for heads to be put on pikes in traditional style and for the tumbrels to roll again.

But we have an opportunity. An opportunity that comes rarely. A chance to bring our democracy – not to some golden past that never existed – but further towards a golden future that urges us on in hope.

And democracy is about DEMOS, the Greek word for people or populace and now to represent democracy itself. We are Demos and the democracy is ours; as always the Greeks really did have a word for it.

I have been seriously distracted for some time; there are many things that I wish to put before you, about debt matters, about this list above, about a new approach to a constitution, about the need to completely rethink company law.

Much of this must be essays, and I will put those on my website, Control Your Debt Crisis ; but I will run a long series here as an introduction to those ideas. For a real discussion of all this I will set up a forum which will be readable to all, but will ask people to register to contribute [spam makes that necessary] in which I hope we will find lay people and experts discussing how to get from where we are to somewhere a lot better.

To a place, in fact, fit for the 21st Century.

Joseph Harris

Debt Control Man