Posts Tagged ‘debt collectors’

New Lending Code 11: mental health, MALG guidance

November 23, 2009

183. Further and more detailed good practice guidelines have been produced by MALG and are available at: http://www.moneyadvicetrust.org/download.asp . The MALG guidelines will not be monitored and enforced by the Lending Standards Board. [Reproduced with the kind permission of the British Banking Association -see link below]

Because I had read many of the documents some time ago, and not got round to all of them, combined with a period when my attention had to be elsewhere, I had confused the guidelines with the submission to the 2007 review of the Banking Code, and both with some parts of the Consumer Protection Regulations.

Albeit, I have this clear now and apologise should I have attributed rule and regulation to a document which it is not in. But the effect of my comments is unaltered.

While the guidelines are given a somewhat detached status, since they are to be neither monitored nor enforced by the standards board, they remain specified good practice. As such they will figure in considerations of the actions of creditors and debt collectors in other places, and cannot be ignored.

The guidelines were of great value when they were published in 2007. While they are not directly included in the Lending Code they are, by this paragraph, made best practice in carrying out the previous 10 paragraphs. This is an invaluable advance for those affected.

While there is no mention of the other vulnerable debtors – elderly and poor – in the new code or in the guidelines, their link in the CPRs should leave no creditor in any doubt that similar care is required for them.

There are 15 main heads in this document and invaluable additions, such as a listing of relevant mental conditions.

In my judgement they leave creditors for no excuse to behave inappropriately in relation to those suffering, once the creditor has been advised of the condition involved. Nor, indeed, against those who fall into the other two vulnerable groups. I would add more to the vulnerable areas.

This is because of the extreme unbalance in the ‘playing field’ between the enormous companies and the defaulting individuals who have no experience or knowledge of the area. For that group of scurrilous companies – some of the biggest of banks – who follow an aggressive  path, I feel these regulations still lack the teeth that are needed to protect.

Well, I suppose these gripes are part of my shopping list for the next reviews in all areas!

That said I believe thanks and congratulations are due to all those who have worked extremely hard over many years to make these new paragraphs and  their guidelines part of the body of rules.

Joseph Harris, Debt Control Man
Author: Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms
http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk
The new Lending Code is here http://www.bba.org.uk/bba/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=1758
The MALG 2007 submission to the review of the code is here http://www.moneyadvicetrust.org/download.asp
And the Treasury Select committee view is here http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmtreasy/274/27406.htm#a18

New Lending Code 4:mental health, third parties

November 11, 2009
175. Where it is appropriate and with a customer’s consent, subscribers should work with advice agencies and health and social care professionals in a joined-up way to exchange information and ensure an effective dialogue. [Reproduced with the kind permission of the British Banking Association -see link below]

Many creditors, and some debt collectors, may well prefer to work with representative agencies. Always much easier to work to a routine and have someone else work out the details, and do all the questioning and examining.

Especially if that intermediary, that third party, because of its own pressures, needs to pigeonhole and classify elements of the debtors finances and problems.

Often this is presented as a requirement. To my mind this is disgraceful, and a breach of the terms under the defunct Banking Code, the new Lending Code and under the Consumer Protection Regulations.

Of course this third party representation can work sometimes for the debtor. But many cases have unique elements that are quite difficult to satisfactorily understand, let alone resolve.

For that reason among many others, such as the individual’s rights in a democracy, it is important that the right to represent oneself is again emphasised.

By implication the institutions are told that they are dealing with an individual, and that individual will decide whether to use an intermediary or not.

Notice also the reference to a ‘joined up way’ and ‘effective dialogue’. One hopes this is more effective that Tony Blair’s joined up government. But putting that humour aside, it does mean that the obligation is on the creditor to ensure proper collection of information and making inclusive judgement after all the to and fro discussion.

Creditors are also, by implication, required to inform themselves on mental health issues. This is why a specialist department for the vulnerable cases is not just a good idea, but sound practice. The creation of such departments should be treated both as a matter of urgency, and enforced by the OFT.

Joseph Harris, Debt Control Man

Author: Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms

http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk

The new Lending Code is here http://www.bba.org.uk/bba/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=1758

The MALG 2007 submission to the review of the code is here http://www.moneyadvicetrust.org/download.asp

And the Treasury Select committee view is here http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmtreasy/274/27406.htm#a18

New Lending Code 2: mental health, systems

November 6, 2009

Debt and mental health
This section of guidance is relevant to both personal and micro-enterprise customers.
173. The impacts of financial difficulty can be especially acute for customers with mental health problems. Subscribers should consider their processes and systems to ensure that they can be responsive to a customer in financial difficulties, from the point at which they are made aware of a mental health problem. [Reproduced with the kind permission of the British Banking Association – here]

The Lending Code is now part of the formal equipment of the Office of Fair Trading, and sits more certainly side by side with holding of Credit Licences and with such fair dealings rules as the Consumer Protection Regulations.

Monitoring remains with the Lending Standards Board [that was the Banking Code Standards Board], but penalising becomes a matter for the OFT.

This is why this is such an important advance. It is now a requirement for creditors and debt collectors to take into account mental problems where there are financial difficulties. This is already covered in the CPRs, under the guise of vulnerable debtors. Vulnerable includes the elderly and those without funds.

While the Debt and Mental Health section is by no means as definite as I would like, it is such a big strengthening of the position of debtors with such health problem that the wording is to be praised as improving the experience of such debtors.

By featuring the good practice guidelines of the Money Advice Liaison Group, the other members of the vulnerable classification are effectively included. The more definite advice in the guidelines also becomes part of good practice.

It is also worth glancing at the 2005 comments of the Treasury Select Committee.

Joseph Harris, Debt Control Man
Author: Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms
http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk

A Word For Debt Collectors

October 5, 2008

Preparing part of the step by step book I am hoping to have ready for you very soon I had to think about debt collectors.

And, in a way, I do have some sympathy for them. And moreso perhaps for their staffs.

There are, after all, one or two areas where their activities are useful. These are where the people who they are chasing really are out to cheat and maybe involved in scams of one sort or another. And they seem to have an expertise in hunting down people who move around.

That is a word for them in support. There is another word for them when they are making the lives of people trying to do their best a misery.

Putting aside the scurrilous game of chasing debts that are out of time or already paid, they cannot get involved unless the creditors call them in.

Now in my experience creditors call in debt collectors inappropriately. They call them in when there is a negotiation on the table. I have seen them called in when the creditor tells me I have eight weeks to respond to a letter.

I have seen them called in when a negotiation has moved on the the FOS. Once there, until the FOS reaches a decision the matter is in arbitration.

I have seen them called in erratically during early exchanges of a negotiation. And I have seen them called in even after an agreement has been reached.

And I have seen recovery teams within a creditor formed into an inhouse debt collection agency, with all the pretence of being a separate company.

So, while there are many things to be said about the manner of debt collectors, they really should be in the mix only after all negotiation, including the FOS arbitration, has been completed AND if here remains real reason to believe that default is deliberate; and that means NOT by assumption, by rote or by procedure.

And there are many things to be said about the manner of debt collectors. Here the regulators are very weak in enforcing fairness. But that deserves not just another post in this blog, but a whole book!

Joseph Harris
Debt Control Man