Posts Tagged ‘income’

Hold on to your cash

April 22, 2009

I do not often discuss the wider economic picture here. This is because there is enough to discuss on issues of how to control one’s own affairs.

But I do feel that this is one of those times that wider events are going to impact on exactly that, and quite seriously.

My view of the direction of the British and of the world economy is extremely bleak. For me this is no recent conversion. For as long as I can remember I found the idea of exponential growth in a finite world merely disaster waiting its opportunity.

It is my belief that now the changes will be quite dramatic; if they are understood then there can be an orderly and planned move to the changes.

But in the interim you and I need our wits about us. And the first move is the opposite of the ‘wisdom’ from official circles. You need your cash more than some over-exposed company. You have no duty to spend. Rather you have a duty to think how you will manage in the next years if there is a drop in your income.

And – unless you are one of the few lucky ones – your income will not rise and is most likely to fall. This will look acceptable as deflation operates for a few years. But the actions of governments, and the continued thinking – that if you are in debt you should borrow your way out – promises a massive inflation following on from that.

In terms of debts and repayment, my advice is to is to ensure you have kept in your own pocket everything you possibly can; and I give advice on that elsewhere. While it may feel like a good idea to repay debt as fast as you can it may not be your best approach at this time.

In view of the difficulties ahead I may write more on the wider picture, but for now please think very carefully when faced with any expenditure – including repayments.

Joseph Harris – Debt Control Man
author: Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms
site: http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk

Negotiating With Creditors for Changes in Terms and Loan and Debt Schedules – 4

September 25, 2008

Let’s now talk about the repayments and the charges from creditors.

So far this set of blogs has covered the basic thinking for a negotiation, what the companies are like and the need for understanding the rules, and my ever-critical view of interest rates.

Repayments are a contractual obligation, and nothing I say should be seen as altering that basic point. There are however many different ways of viewing what this means in practice. Especially bearing in mind the matter of force majeure.

When the debtor – you and I – are able to pay without any problems there is no reason for varying the payment schedule, unless it is to match changes on your own income receipts or to put right a change made by the creditor using his supposed right to vary any terms unilaterally. There are reports of this being done to trigger late payment charges.

There are also cases of increasing repayments by 50% by upping the monthly percentage, which obviously causes budget stress and increases the likelihood of triggering charges.

More significant in the call for repayment variations is the reduction of personal disposable income. There are many ways this can happen. I would suggest that among these is loss of bonus, loss of job and taking lower paying jobs, the effects of inflation, additional family commitments and accident or ill-health problems.

The majority of creditors will discuss lower payments, though they have their own ideas of what lower means. For you this is a matter of redoing your budget and seeing how that places you. This is the information that will inform each of we debtors and this will also inform them.

Since it is my view that inflation is about to show some serious muscle I advise frequent and regular personal budget reviews.

You do need to think in terms of treating all creditors equally, so the usual way is to establish what you might be able to afford and apportion that in relation to each debt. If you have any difficulty sorting it out any of the online charities will give help. Maybe the excellent fora – forums if you prefer – will have mathematical geniuses who will put a little time in to giving you the answers.

Don’t take no for an answer and don’t let the creditors bully.

And then… and then… and then is the matter of penalties and special charges. These are applied in all sorts of ways and are purely profit centres for the creditors.

In a ruling early this year the Office of Fair Trading determined that charges should relate to the actual costs that the charges relate to. anything above that becomes a fine, and there is no legal support of companies to levy fines.

Unfortunately the OFT also stated a maximum level for a bundle of different charges and set it at £12. this was less than the previous figure of £20 – and sometimes £25 0r £30. Of course putting it this way was a gift to the creditors who immediately made all charges £12 [and I would be interested in any evidence of new types of charges being levied at that time].

Now it is my contention that these charges are mostly illegal fines. The reason rests on the rules of fairness and the point in the ruling about relating to costs. I will talk only about late fees, but this will stand for others as well.

Examine the way a late fee is determined and levied (as a fine). The computer – yes, the computer – has a program written by groups of clever fellows to do all the paperwork, calculate interest, instantly apply changes of all kinds, and react to the time a payment is received.

If the deadline is midnight and the payment comes in a one minute past – maybe one second – the computer automatically triggers the late fee script and sets it for the following statement. On the statement this requires a miniscule amount of bulk-purchased ink or powder and enough extra time on the automatic printing system to print one extra line.

If you have ever seen those in action you know we are talking about a fraction of a second. The script action requires no extra time since it is a choice of options. At a guess we are talking 0.0001p for the ink and 0.001p for the time.

So by my estimate a £12 levy includes a justifiable charge of 0.0011 and a fine of £11 99.9989p.

If anyone has figures to disprove this estimate I welcome them. The idea floated by one senior executive that there is a little man in a smoke-filled back office checking every charge is not just risible, but an obvious …er… mis-statement.

Joseph Harris
Debt Control Man

Matching Debt Repayments to the Budget

September 4, 2008

A vital part of the process of contacting creditors to negotiate a new arrangement is the income and expenditure statement. They need it to assess what they can ask for and you need it to assess what you can afford to pay.
Usually you will receive a budget form from the company. My advice is ignore it. Not the need to present a completed form, but the actual form they send. The reasons for this are many, among them the fact that each company has its own layout, and none are about you; they are about the company!
Now more important is the fact we are facing difficult times. Living costs will inflate for some time, and it is likely that incomes will decline. A squeeze.
So long as you describe your needs clearly in this income and expenditure account it will provide the essential and accurate point for discussion.
I favour this accompanying your second letter, when you have had time to review all your affairs carefully. It might be worth setting it out roughly and putting it aside to come back to for review and correction. When you finally send this off it is vital that you have all items of expenditure included.
This is the 21st century; you are expected to continue to live without starving and without being homeless. In pursuit of this there are certain priority debts and payments. These must be deducted from your income before any attempt to assess what you might be able to pay towards settlement of non-priority debts.
If this gives a debit position—in other words if you need more money than you have to meet your needs then your creditors cannot expect payments.
As you investigate further you will learn of the options for managing your position: IVAs, bankruptcy and so on, and be told about bailiffs and court action. Court action—which rarely happens—will in any case be a long way down the road, and bailiffs can only be involved after court action.
You have research to do of course and trying to work out your personal best course of action. As you seek advice as well you will probably find your first fears recede, and options which you can handle with little discomfort becoming realistic.
That is exactly what I found. Because those who might have been intermediaries gave me advice that was not very sensible for me and made hashes of the figures I gave them I determined that it was up to me. And I am glad I took the step to control my debt crisis on my own terms.