Posts Tagged ‘vulnerable’

New Lending Code 11: mental health, MALG guidance

November 23, 2009

183. Further and more detailed good practice guidelines have been produced by MALG and are available at: http://www.moneyadvicetrust.org/download.asp . The MALG guidelines will not be monitored and enforced by the Lending Standards Board. [Reproduced with the kind permission of the British Banking Association -see link below]

Because I had read many of the documents some time ago, and not got round to all of them, combined with a period when my attention had to be elsewhere, I had confused the guidelines with the submission to the 2007 review of the Banking Code, and both with some parts of the Consumer Protection Regulations.

Albeit, I have this clear now and apologise should I have attributed rule and regulation to a document which it is not in. But the effect of my comments is unaltered.

While the guidelines are given a somewhat detached status, since they are to be neither monitored nor enforced by the standards board, they remain specified good practice. As such they will figure in considerations of the actions of creditors and debt collectors in other places, and cannot be ignored.

The guidelines were of great value when they were published in 2007. While they are not directly included in the Lending Code they are, by this paragraph, made best practice in carrying out the previous 10 paragraphs. This is an invaluable advance for those affected.

While there is no mention of the other vulnerable debtors – elderly and poor – in the new code or in the guidelines, their link in the CPRs should leave no creditor in any doubt that similar care is required for them.

There are 15 main heads in this document and invaluable additions, such as a listing of relevant mental conditions.

In my judgement they leave creditors for no excuse to behave inappropriately in relation to those suffering, once the creditor has been advised of the condition involved. Nor, indeed, against those who fall into the other two vulnerable groups. I would add more to the vulnerable areas.

This is because of the extreme unbalance in the ‘playing field’ between the enormous companies and the defaulting individuals who have no experience or knowledge of the area. For that group of scurrilous companies – some of the biggest of banks – who follow an aggressive  path, I feel these regulations still lack the teeth that are needed to protect.

Well, I suppose these gripes are part of my shopping list for the next reviews in all areas!

That said I believe thanks and congratulations are due to all those who have worked extremely hard over many years to make these new paragraphs and  their guidelines part of the body of rules.

Joseph Harris, Debt Control Man
Author: Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms
http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk
The new Lending Code is here http://www.bba.org.uk/bba/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=1758
The MALG 2007 submission to the review of the code is here http://www.moneyadvicetrust.org/download.asp
And the Treasury Select committee view is here http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmtreasy/274/27406.htm#a18

New Lending Code 4:mental health, third parties

November 11, 2009
175. Where it is appropriate and with a customer’s consent, subscribers should work with advice agencies and health and social care professionals in a joined-up way to exchange information and ensure an effective dialogue. [Reproduced with the kind permission of the British Banking Association -see link below]

Many creditors, and some debt collectors, may well prefer to work with representative agencies. Always much easier to work to a routine and have someone else work out the details, and do all the questioning and examining.

Especially if that intermediary, that third party, because of its own pressures, needs to pigeonhole and classify elements of the debtors finances and problems.

Often this is presented as a requirement. To my mind this is disgraceful, and a breach of the terms under the defunct Banking Code, the new Lending Code and under the Consumer Protection Regulations.

Of course this third party representation can work sometimes for the debtor. But many cases have unique elements that are quite difficult to satisfactorily understand, let alone resolve.

For that reason among many others, such as the individual’s rights in a democracy, it is important that the right to represent oneself is again emphasised.

By implication the institutions are told that they are dealing with an individual, and that individual will decide whether to use an intermediary or not.

Notice also the reference to a ‘joined up way’ and ‘effective dialogue’. One hopes this is more effective that Tony Blair’s joined up government. But putting that humour aside, it does mean that the obligation is on the creditor to ensure proper collection of information and making inclusive judgement after all the to and fro discussion.

Creditors are also, by implication, required to inform themselves on mental health issues. This is why a specialist department for the vulnerable cases is not just a good idea, but sound practice. The creation of such departments should be treated both as a matter of urgency, and enforced by the OFT.

Joseph Harris, Debt Control Man

Author: Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms

http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk

The new Lending Code is here http://www.bba.org.uk/bba/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=1758

The MALG 2007 submission to the review of the code is here http://www.moneyadvicetrust.org/download.asp

And the Treasury Select committee view is here http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmtreasy/274/27406.htm#a18

New Lending Code 3: mental health, responses

November 10, 2009
174. The appropriate response will differ in each case and could involve a range of approaches, including:
• working positively with an advice agency
• promptly carrying out agreed actions
• being flexible in responding to offers or schedules of repayment
• sensitively managing communications with the customer (for example preventing unnecessary and unwelcome mailings). [Reproduced with the kind permission of the British Banking Association -see link below]

 

Paragraph 174 has some useful pointers to the creditor on how to handle its dealings with vulnerable debtors.

These terms: ‘positively … promptly … flexible … sensitively’ give a clear indication of the manner in which companies should gear these particular contacts. This is in sharp contrast to the normally aggressive and harassing manner of most debt collection departments and debt collection agencies.

Sensitive in the context of this matter is defined as finely aware of the attitudes and feelings of others [The Penguin English Dictionary].

While I suggest the companies rethink their whole collection procedures in light of this advice, it will be a big advance if they do so at least for the vulnerable. Since the Consumer Protection Regulations already feature the idea of differences of approach to vulnerable consumers, there is now no excuse for creditors not making this policy for their internal procedures.

Those who prefer to handle their own affairs should note that the use of advice agencies remains an option, not a requirement. While the specialist charities do know their own fields, and offer more awareness, you should be careful about the awareness of any intermediary over your own situation.

Never allow yourself to be harassed over this by agents. Remember it is not your job to make the companies’ lives easier, but to get fair treatment – and to yourself behave fairly!

If companies fail to show this level of care in a case of mental health disorder they should be reported to the monitoring agency – The Lending Standards Board. If you feel the matter is serious I suggest you also report it to the Licences Section of the Office of Fair Trading.

Joseph Harris, Debt Control Man
Author: Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms
http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk

The new Lending Code is here http://www.bba.org.uk/bba/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=1758

The MALG 2007 submission to the review of the code is here http://www.moneyadvicetrust.org/download.asp

And the Treasury Select committee view is here http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmtreasy/274/27406.htm#a18

Lending Code secrecy ‘is a disgrace’

October 12, 2009

I have just released this press release; as you see it is a matter of some seriousness

The new Lending Code, which replaces the credit and financial difficulties sections of the defunct Banking Code, is due to come into effect on November 1. Some nineteen short days away.

There is to be no public sight of these changes, nor any consultation process before these changes come into effect.

Specialist author Joseph Harris – Debt Control Man – has been trying to get sight of these changes since June. He has been told they will not be released until they are in effect on November 1 by Paul Ross, the man who is writing the new document for the British Bankers Association, in an email.

“This is a clear case of dictatorial behaviour,” declares Mr Harris. “It is a disgrace that no one concerned with the field, nor any debtor – whether defaulting or not – has any idea how the changes will affect them.

“Vince Cable was wrong when he said Gordon Brown had changed from Stalin to Mr Bean. On the basis of this secrecy and undemocratic behaviour he remains Stalin.”

Phone calls and emails to the FSA and the OFT result in classic Civil Service dropping the query into the new virtual filing bin.

“Even though there are many rules to help debtors negotiate the treacherous waters of finding the best way for their needs, too many creditors and debt collectors – including the biggest companies – do their best to sidestep them.

“Lack of a clear knowledge of what is happening among debtors and their advisors leaves these worst companies a window of opportunity to harass and bully particularly the poorest and most vulnerable debtors,” adds Mr Harris, author of Control Your Debt Crisis on Your Own Terms http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk/book-cydc/cydc_Book_intro.shtml .,

“It is also a tragedy that the opportunity to include the requests of the Treasury Select Committee in 2005 and of the Money Advice Liaison Group has been lost.”

While most of the Banking Code is being operated as statutory Code of Practice directly by the FSA, the credit and financial difficulties sections move to the The Office of Fair Trading to sit beside the OFT’s duties controlling issue of Consumer and Business Credit Licences.

Joseph Harris, Debt Control Man

Bailiff Power: “We have the balance wrong”

June 13, 2009

Every time I think I have reached the bottom of this government’s inanities over bailiffs I am apprised of further actions which make sense only if these people are in the pay of the financial casino.

Thanks again to the Zacchaeus 2000 Trust I have learned of the Bill introduced by Karen Buck M.P., (Labour for Regent’s Park and Kensington, North), a few days ago under the ten minute rule. It has gone now to second reading which is a triumph for her preparation work which has taken a year.

[Most often ten minute rule Bills are killed at birth!]

In her introductory remarks Ms Buck offers these points which are worth some thought by us all: Bailiffs (Repeals and Amendment) is the title of the Bill and it “… make requirements in respect of the use of force and forcible entry by bailiffs; to make provision for the reference to court of certain cases involving vulnerable clients; and for connected purposes.”

“… Debt and debt recovery action have become a reality for ever larger numbers… the arrival of a bailiff is, for many of those people, the ultimate trauma and humiliation… people have had heart attacks when the bailiffs have arrived. The mental and physical stress… is one of the worst things that will ever happen to them in their life.”

She points out that not all bailiffs fail to be as helpful as possible. But “… many.. are desperate and vulnerable people, and many are also victims of error. … even the actions of bailiffs who behave entirely reasonably… are disproportionate and excessive.”

“… it has become clear to me that we have got the balance wrong,… we need to review… We must certainly not, in any circumstances, think of escalating the powers available to bailiffs, and the Government should rethink their approach to regulation.” [my emphasis]

“… In my local authority alone, and in respect of just… council tax… more than 13,000 cases ended up in the hands of bailiffs over a three-year period.”

“What does it mean… It means fear and trauma for people, particularly children. I have heard of moving cases… children have refused to leave the house or have insisted on having the lights out at home because they are so frightened of a bailiff… seizing their television or computer.”

“… also means an escalation of the original debt, which simply compounds the problems that caused the financial crisis in the first place.”

“For one single parent with three children, one… disabled… (a) parking fine, about which I was making representations, had escalated from an original £60 to £700 by the time the bailiffs arrived.” [my emphasis]

In another “… two sets of bailiffs (were) chasing the same debt. Payments had been made to and acknowledged by the council, but did not then appear on the system.” [my emphasis] This lady wrote “… each party refers me to the other, the fees are ever increasing and.. threatening the removal of goods for the same amount.”

The Bill’s aims “.. are threefold. The power of forcible entry into a person’s home and the power for bailiffs even to use force against debtors are far too extreme to be given to civilian enforcement officers. The balance has been tilted too far against the householder’s right to be secure from trespass into their home. ” [my emphasis]

“… overturns a long-standing common law tradition,… in the Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007… some p[owers] have not (yet) been brought into effect… such powers should be repealed.”

“… the power to enter domestic premises forcibly… for collection of criminal fines is already legal, and that too is creating appalling distress for many vulnerable households. Many… fines are levied on people on low incomes for offences such as the non-payment of TV licences, fare dodging and truancy.”

“… the issue here, too, is one of proportionality,… I also seek a statutory procedure requiring bailiffs to return cases involving vulnerable and impoverished debtors to the courts or the creditors, and powers to allow people subject to any bailiff action to apply to the courts for any bailiff warrant to be suspended… (this) is (currently) available only to people subject to county court bailiff warrants.”

“… case law, which holds that a distress warrant cannot be withdrawn once it has been issued. That directly contradicts the national standards for enforcement agents, which suggests a procedure enabling the bailiff to return cases of vulnerable fine defaulters to the court.”

“… disproportionate fines are being paid by benefit claimants and other low-income groups, intensifying the poverty that pushed many of them into debtY Finally, we need a statutory provision for bailiffs to accept ‘affordable payments’, with a definition of what that might mean in practice…”

“… I believe that they need greater protection, and above all, to be freed from the fear of the implementation of the excessively harsh powers held in reserve in the legislation.”

The Bill has six more stages; second and third reading in the Commons; first, second and third readings in the Lords; and signature by Her Majesty. It is only a pity that with this government tottering and the next election in any case but a year away the chances of it becoming law are slim.

But ‘good on yer’ Karen Black; you’re one we need back in the Commons. And keep it up Zacchaeus Trust; we need you.

Debt Control Man